Science museum

Science Museum works to choose official Minnesota state fossil


The Science Museum of Minnesota is working on establishing an official state fossil. The museum provided its own recommendations, but is now seeking recommendations from the public.

The state’s official fossil must be found naturally in Minnesota and be old enough to be considered a fossil, which is around 10,000 years old, according to National Geographic.

The recommendations of the Science Museum are:

Homotherium serum: A large predatory cat whose fossils are found in Fillmore County.

Squalicorax: An extinct shark whose fossils are found in the Mesabi Iron Range.

Terminonaris robusta: A large crocodile relative whose fossils can be found in the Mesabi Iron Range.

Stromatolite: A fossil made from photosynthetic bacteria found in northern Minnesota.

Mammuthus columbi: A mammoth whose fossils are found in central and southern Minnesota.

Dikelocephalus minnesotensis: A trilobite whose fossils are found in the valley of the Sainte-Croix river.

Endocera: A marine animal up to ten feet in length whose fossils are found in the Twin Cities region.

Ancient bison: A bison whose fossils are found in central and southern Minnesota.

According to the museum, Minnesota is one of the seven state fossil-free states.

In 1988, state lawmakers proposed a bill that would designate the giant beaver as the state fossil, although it never became law. Lawmakers have also proposed rynchotrema, trilobite, and bison.